National Popular Vote Interstate Compact

In two of the last five elections the candidate the Electoral College has failed to elect the candidate who won the popular vote. The National Popular Vote interstate compact would guarantee the Presidency to the candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

The National Popular Vote interstate compact would not take effect until enacted by states possessing a majority of the electoral votes—that is, enough to elect a President (270 of 538). Under the compact, the national popular vote winner would be the candidate who received the most popular votes from all 50 states (and DC) on Election Day. When the Electoral College meets in mid-December, the national popular vote winner would receive all of the electoral votes of the enacting states.

The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted by 12 jurisdictions possessing 172 electoral votes, including four small jurisdictions (RI, VT, HI, DC), four medium- size states (CT, MD, MA, WA), and four big states (NJ, IL, NY, CA). With 98 electoral votes needed for the act to take effect and states with initiative that have yet to pass having a total of 159 electoral votes (see below), we could finish the process of gathering the electoral votes needed to put the act into effect.

States with the initiative that have yet to sign on to the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact (electoral votes in parentheses): Alaska (3), Arizona (11), Arkansas (6), Colorado (9), Florida (29), Idaho (4), Maine (4), Michigan (16), Mississippi (6), Missouri (10), Montana (3), Nebraska (5), Nevada (6), North Dakota (3), Ohio (18), Oklahoma (7), Oregon (7), South Dakota (3), Utah (6), Wyoming (3). 

The National Popular Vote Interstate Compact would ensure that every vote, in every state, will matter in every presidential election.